Flea, Tick, and Heartworm Prevention

cat scratching

Spring has definitely sprung in the San Lorenzo Valley, and if you’re like us, you and your pets can’t wait to get outside more and more. But before you head outside this spring and summer for gardening, trips to the dog park, hiking, and general frolicking, let’s get up to date on parasite prevention.

When the Felton flora and fauna wake up from their winter slumber, you better believe that parasites are awake, too. However, we’ve also noticed that mosquitoes, fleas, and even ticks are even more resilient than ever, and with overall warmer winter temperatures and their ability to overwinter indoors (think: your garage, your shed, your house!), we’re now recommending parasite prevention and control all year round. Here’s more from Felton Veterinary Hospital about why prevention is your best medicine.

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Pet Poisoning: Prevention Is Key

puppy and kitten together

Our four-legged friends tend to be active and adventurous, and we love that about them! However, at times they can – shall we say – “get into things” that they shouldn’t. Hopefully, your pets have never ingested anything that caused a pet emergency, but it’s always great to be prepared!

As we spring into spring, we’re all itching to get outside. It’s amazing (and somewhat scary!) how many potential poisons are in and around the average garden, yard, and home. With that in mind, Felton Veterinary Hospital has put together here a few tips and ideas for how to prevent pet poisoning at home.

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The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly: Not All Dental Chews Are Created Equal

dog chewing on treat

Many of us love to give our pets a daily dental chew or treat. After all, we like to give them treats (and see their eyes light up with love) and we like to do something good for their teeth and oral health. But did you know that some of the very commonly advertised “oral health” products on the market are either unhelpful, unsafe, or downright bad for our pets?

At Felton Veterinary Hospital, we looked into this recently and found that not all dental chews and treats are created equal. And we bet you can’t wait to hear what we found out!

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An Ounce of Prevention: The Basics of Pet Dental Care

smiling dog

Most of us are not exactly excited about looking into our pet’s mouths (I only see 2 teeth – the fangs!). But when it comes to pet dental care, the saying “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” is absolutely true. It has been reported that by 3 years of age, 85% of cats and dogs have some form of dental disease. Felton Veterinary Hospital is here to give you the basics of this common but preventable problem.

First, the true nitty-gritty. You brush your teeth twice a day (right?) and still visit your dentist for a cleaning twice a year. Imagine what your mouth would feel like if you never brushed or saw the dentist! It’s true that our pets’ teeth don’t have to look picture-perfect, but keeping their teeth and gums clean and healthy can be one of the most beneficial things you can do as a pet owner to keep them happy and healthy for longer.

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In With the New: New Year’s Resolutions for Pet Owners

cat & dog resting

Have you made any New Year’s resolutions yet? 2017 has wound down, and with 2018 just beginning it’s a great time to look ahead and think about what we want to do differently this year. Maybe you want to eat better, hit the gym more frequently, and enjoy life more? Well, why not include your pet in some of your new year’s resolutions? Not sure where to start? The team at Felton Veterinary Hospital has you covered. Below are some ideas for New Year’s resolutions for pet owners, to get the New Year started off right for your pet.

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Tinsel, Turkey, and Travel, Oh My! Holiday Safety for Pets

Dog & Cat with Christmas Hats

The holiday season is upon us, and many of us want to include our furry family members in the celebrations. As you prepare for the holidays, remember that it is important to try and keep your pet’s exercise and feeding routine as normal as possible. To help you along in this magical time of year, the team at Felton Veterinary Hospital has compiled some tips for celebrating the holidays safely with your pet.

Decorations

The Tree — Perhaps the quintessential holiday icon, the Christmas tree can pose some health hazards for dogs and cats. You may want to secure the tree to the wall, so that it can’t tip over. Watch carefully that pets don’t drink the Christmas tree water, which could cause stomach upset or diarrhea.

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Swimming for Weight Loss – In dogs?

dog swimming

As we all think about getting into our swimsuits this summer, perhaps the question on our minds is- oops- how can I lose a little weight? In addition to saying no to that next ice cream cone, swimming is often the answer for many people when they think about how to lose a few extra pounds. Guess what? For dogs, it is often the same (minus the ice cream!)

Jake’s story

When Dianne brought her chocolate Labrador Retriever, Molly, in to see Dr. Atton, she was 114 lbs and overweight. Dr. Atton told Dianne that Molly needed to lose weight, and he meant it! It was hard work and took a lot of perseverance, canned pumpkin, and string beans, but after a year Molly reached her goal weight. Her favorite exercise is power walking!

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Top 8 Reasons Your Senior Pet Should See A Vet

Our pets love us unconditionally and provide us (their humans) with companionship, love, fun, and exercise. Our pets are good for us in so many ways – mentally, emotionally, and it’s been proven over and over that even our physical health benefits from our relationships with our pet companions.

Senior Pets (defined as seven years or older for most dogs and cats, and 6 years in larger dog breeds) can experience many of the same problems seen in older people – such as:

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Vestibular Disease

Email this article Vestibular Disease

What on Earth is the Vestibular Apparatus?

In a nutshell, the vestibular apparatus is the neurological equipment responsible for perceiving your body’s orientation relative to the earth (determining if you are upside down, standing up straight, falling etc.), which inform your eyes and extremities how they should move accordingly.

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Heartworm

What Happens in Heartworm Disease
By Wendy C. Brooks DVM, DABVP

Heartworm Disease vs. Heartworm Infection

Before reviewing the clinical signs seen in heartworm disease, an important distinction must be made between heartworm disease and heartworm infection. Heartworm infection by definition means the host animal (generally a dog) is parasitized by at least one life stage of the heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis). Dogs with heartworms in their bodies do not necessarily have adult worms in their hearts; they may have larval heartworms in their skin only. Dogs with heartworms in their bodies are not necessarily sick, either. Dogs with only larvae of one stage or another are not sick and it is controversial how dangerous it is for a dog to have only one or two adult heartworms. These dogs are certainly infected but they do not have heartworm disease.

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