Diabetes in Pets

It’s pet diabetes month, and what better way to focus on this common issue in cats and dogs than with help from your Felton Veterinary Hospital team? When we think about diabetes, our pets may not be at the top of our minds, but this debilitating disease is rising in both people and pets alike. According to Banfield Pet Hospital’s 2016 State of Pet Health Report, diabetes in dogs increased by nearly 80 percent from 2006 to 2015. 

Diabetes is more common in middle-aged and older pets, but any pet can be affected. In addition, the disease commonly leads to other conditions, such as heart, kidney, and liver disease and cataracts. So pet owners must be aware of the risks and signs of diabetes in pets and how to prevent this disease from affecting their beloved pet. 

The good news is that with early detection, you and your veterinarian can successfully manage the disease through diet, exercise, regular monitoring, and treatment. With mindful interventions, pets with diabetes can still live healthy, long lives. 

Continue…

The Heart of the Matter: Dilated Cardiomyopathy

A dog with a heart-shaped stuffy

February is the month of Valentine hearts and flowers, but did you know that it’s also American Heart Month? To celebrate, Felton Veterinary Hospital is shining a spotlight on pet heart health by focusing on the signs of heart disease in pets, and what pet owners can do to prevent it. 

Nearly ten percent of pets suffer from heart disease. Like humans, animals experience different forms of heart disease – some that are genetic or age-related, and some that develop from other health issues. While many heart problems cannot be prevented, pets can still enjoy healthy, long lives with early detection of disease, careful management, and a healthy lifestyle.  Continue…

The Light Fantastic: Laser Therapy For Pets

Cat on an exam table

Is your older kitty “slowing down?” Has your agility dog suffered an injury that just won’t heal? In these and many other scenarios, it’s possible that laser therapy could be the answer to your pet’s pain and discomfort. 

Used for years in humans, laser therapy for pets uses Class IV laser light to stimulate healthy cell growth, repair damaged cells, and promote healing and pain relief. 

At Felton Veterinary Hospital, we are proud to offer this therapy, and we are thrilled to share the benefits with our patients and friends. 

Continue…

Much Ado About Canine Flu

Two dogs waiting for a command

This winter has been quite the flu season! Many of us were ill thanks to the dreaded human flu, and we’re glad to finally be seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. It’s interesting that canine flu has recently become a focus, especially in dog-loving circles. And while it’s not seasonal, and it’s not new, there are a few things that the team at Felton Veterinary Hospital thought you should know about this disease that affects our best friends.

Canine Flu Basics

There are two strains of Canine Influenza Virus (CIV). The most recent strain (H3N2)  was identified following an outbreak in March of 2015 and affected dogs in the Chicago area. There have now been a few thousand cases of H3N2 reported in 30 states.  There’s no evidence that H3N2 can infect people.

Continue…

Pet Poisoning: Prevention Is Key

puppy and kitten together

Our four-legged friends tend to be active and adventurous, and we love that about them! However, at times they can – shall we say – “get into things” that they shouldn’t. Hopefully, your pets have never ingested anything that caused a pet emergency, but it’s always great to be prepared!

As we spring into spring, we’re all itching to get outside. It’s amazing (and somewhat scary!) how many potential poisons are in and around the average garden, yard, and home. With that in mind, Felton Veterinary Hospital has put together here a few tips and ideas for how to prevent pet poisoning at home.

Continue…

Heartworm

What Happens in Heartworm Disease
By Wendy C. Brooks DVM, DABVP

Heartworm Disease vs. Heartworm Infection

Before reviewing the clinical signs seen in heartworm disease, an important distinction must be made between heartworm disease and heartworm infection. Heartworm infection by definition means the host animal (generally a dog) is parasitized by at least one life stage of the heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis). Dogs with heartworms in their bodies do not necessarily have adult worms in their hearts; they may have larval heartworms in their skin only. Dogs with heartworms in their bodies are not necessarily sick, either. Dogs with only larvae of one stage or another are not sick and it is controversial how dangerous it is for a dog to have only one or two adult heartworms. These dogs are certainly infected but they do not have heartworm disease.

Continue…

Fleas

Print this article  Email this article

Fleas: Know your Enemy

Despite numerous technological advances, fleas continue to represent a potentially lethal plague upon our pets. Current products are effective so there is little reason for this; the problem seems to be one of understanding.
There are over 1900 flea species in the world. Pet owners are concerned with only one: Ctenocephalides felis, the cat flea. This is the flea that we find on our pets (cats, dogs, rabbits, and other species) in 99.9% of cases and in order to understand how to control the damage caused by this tiny little animal, you should learn all you can about it.

Continue…

Diabetes Mellitus

Dentistry

Periodontal Disease in Pets

More than 85% of dogs and cats older than four years have periodontal concerns. There are four periodontal types of tissue: the gingiva (gum), cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar supporting bone.

Periodontal disease starts when plaque forms; plaque is a transparent adhesive fluid composed of mucin, sloughed epithelial cells, and aerobic, and gram-positive cocci. Plaque starts forming two days after a dental cleaning. If the plaque is not removed, mineral salts in the food can precipitate to form hard dental calculus. The calculus is irritating to the gingival tissue, changing the pH of the mouth and allowing bacteria to survive subgingivally. By-products of these bacteria “eat away” at the tooth’s support structures, eventually causing the tooth to be lost in some cases.

Continue…

Cancer

Fighting Cancer

Cancer is the most common natural cause of death in dogs in the United States and Canada. And while the diagnosis is one that every pet lover dreads, the fact is that canine cancer is more treatable than ever before. Even better: Veterinarians now know more about what steps can be taken to help prevent the dreaded disease.

Continue…